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Focused on the application of Omics techniques 13th Indo-Australian Conference curtained down

Rapid fire:

  • The 13th Indo-Australian Biotechnology Conference was hosted by Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia on 30-31 October 2017
  • It focused on the application of Omics techniques towards answering fundamental questions in biology & the route to clinical & translational research
  • Omics aims at the collective characterization and quantification of pools of biological molecules that translate into the structure, function, and dynamics of an organism or organisms
  • Advanced technologies enable us to study the mechanistic of initiation of diseases like cancer, neuronal and immunological disorders which involve a sequence of gene-environment interactions and their progression at macro to micro levels.
  • The Conference was supported by DBT (Govt of India), Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Westmead Millennium Health Institute and Indo-Australian Biotechnology Society.

The 13th Indo-Australian Biotechnology Conference organized by Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia focused on Omics in Health.

The Conference supported by Department of Biotechnology (Ministry of Science and Technology, Govt of India), Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Westmead Millennium Health Institute and Indo-Australian Biotechnology Society took place on 30-31 October 2017.

Presentations in the conference focused on the application of large scale Omics techniques towards answering fundamental questions in biology as well as the route to clinical and translational research. Omics refers to a field of study in biology ending in -omics, such as genomics, proteomics or metabolomics. The related suffix -ome is used to address the objects of study of such fields, such as the genome, proteome or metabolome respectively. Omics aims at the collective characterization and quantification of pools of biological molecules that translate into the structure, function, and dynamics of an organism or organisms.

The presentations demonstrated that Australia and India have major scientific advancement in these fields and there is tremendous scope to examine ways in which the latest developments in high-throughput genomics, proteomics and/or metabolomics in two countries can be synchronized and can be clinically translated.

The conference was important because complex diseases such as cancer, neuronal and immunological disorders involve a sequence of gene-environment interactions in a progressive process that cannot occur without dysfunction in multiple systems. This might include disruption of the genetic, proteomic, metabolic and immune functions. The advancement in technology has enabled us to dissect the mechanistic of disease initiation and progression at macro to micro levels.

The Conference was inaugurated by Professor Carolyn Mountford, CEO, Translational Research Institute and she spoke on ‘The Future of the Omics’. Professor Anne Kelso, CEO of the National Health and Medical Research Council delivered the Keynote Address on the NHMRC support for Omics Research. There were 4 plenary lectures – two presented by speakers from India and two from Australia. Prof M R S Rao (JNCASR) spoke on Long Non Coding RNA and Prof Shubha Chiplunkar (ACTREC) presented her work on Immune Suppressive Networks in Cancer. Prof Frank Gannon (QIMR) spoke on Epigenetic Modifying Enzymes as targets for therapies and Prof Matt Brown (QUT) on Genomics and the future of health care.

At the conference Dinner Dr David Bunker, CEO of the Queensland Genomics Health Alliance spoke on new initiatives and Mr Krish Browne, General Manager – International Collaboration from the Australian Government Department of Industry spoke on bilateral cooperation in science and technology.